Lingoport’s Management

Lingoport’s management team has years of experience in the software globalization industry as software engineers and managers. We’ve all felt the impact that software globalization efforts can have on release goals and revenues. Our engineering services teams are all highly experienced in a wide variety of software technologies and complexities.

Adam Asnes, President & CEO
Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001 after seeing firsthand that the niche for software globalization engineering products and services was underserved in the localization industry. As Lingoport’s President and CEO, he focuses on sales and marketing alliances while maintaining oversight of the company’s internationalization services engineering and Globalyzer product development. Adam is a frequent speaker and columnist on globalization technology as it affects businesses expanding their worldwide reach. For creative inspiration and fun, Adam enjoys cycling and Colorado’s Rocky Mountains.


Lori Cameron, Vice President of Engineering
Lori Cameron is responsible for client project delivery as well as commercial software development at Lingoport. In her over 20 years in the software industry, Lori has served in engineering management roles at Software Publishing and NewWorldIQ, involved with the design, development, and delivery of shrink-wrapped and web-based software applications. She is a graduate of UC Berkeley’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Lori’s hobbies include running, biking, climbing, and her daily latte.


Nina Handler, Vice President of Operations
Nina Handler manages human resources, operations and finance at Lingoport, as well as overseeing financial resources on internationalization service projects. Prior to joining Lingoport, Nina served for 8 years with Fiduciary Trust International in New York as an Economist in the Fixed Income area. In addition, she worked in Washington DC for the Executive Office of the President in the Council on Wage and Price Stability. She holds a BA in Economics from SUNY Binghamton. Nina enjoys spending time with her two children and husband, and enjoys hiking with her dog.


Olivier Libouban, Software Globalization Lead
Olivier Libouban, a native of France, has been working for 25 years in the software industry, for large corporations and start ups, as a software engineer and as a project manager. Olivier has a wide ranging experience in the US, France, Switzerland, and Norway, in R&D departments as well as for client projects of all sizes with complex software environments. Olivier has a Diplôme d’Ingénieur from the National Institute of Applied Sciences in France and a Masters Degree in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.


VMware

A Collaboration in the Globalization of Partner Central

85% of VMware’s revenue comes from its global partner network and providing a quality partner experience globally is essential not only to the bottom line, but also sales growth. Their channel marketing portal, Partner Central, supports 50,000 companies and 300,000 users globally. As much as 90% of the worldwide partners however were not using the portal as a result of the lack of localized content and language barrier issues!
Providing its channel partners with fully localized training and comprehensive sales and marketing resources became critical to drive deeper partner acceptance and membership growth.

Internationalization & Localization Issues

During the initial self-audit on the localization experience across web assets, VMware discovered that while their customer facing websites were polished in terms of localization, partners on Partner Central experienced a disconnected user experience due to lack of translated content and marketing program in their native language. The underlying system did not support date & time formats, character sets or proper sorting order in Japanese. Many strings were hard-coded and there was not a method to transport information in foreign languages from their CMS to the Portal.

To move forward, VMware found that it had to meet the following challenges:

  • Enable the underlying Partner Portal platform to support i18n & L10n with assessment, roadmaps and detailed resource managing.
  • Educate the development team performing internationalization on best-practices and how to spot issues in the code using Globalyzer.
  • Manage cross-functional teams, technological and workflow dependencies across all timezones.
  • Assure that a hard delivery date was met, and defined QA standards were met for every locale.

Why Lingoport

VMware’s Corporate Globalization Group was well versed in localization best-practices, and had amassed a large amount of linguistic assets to assist with localization workflow. However, Partner Central required a partner with expertise internationalization practices and program management services to assist with:

  • gathering architectural and code review level information to create a clear planning path.
  • active participation, guidance and perspective with the internationalization components of the project.
  • program management support to drive i18n implementation with the development team as well as coordinate localization activities within VMware worldwide.

The Solution

Lingoport & VMware developed a robust project plan that looked beyond the surface content, and drilled down into the framework & development layer. Lingoport provided direct input into VMware’s business requirement documents to ensure i18n and L10n requirements were specifically defined.

i18n Issues Cause Solution
Application code not internationalized at all First portal to localize at VMware i18n Assessment & Best Practice Recommendations
Locale management 3rd party tool support
Developer understanding of locale versus language
Careful thinking of how to match language and country to locale management
Developer education First time i18n effort of this portal; developers trivialized importance of i18n/L10n; took assessment recommendations as optional Point back to i18n report
Train, educate, and share mindset along the way, and with hard lessons learned

 

L10n Issues Cause Solution
Difficult to translate Dynamic and highly modular content Screen shots
Excel sheets w/ comments
Guidelines for Master Data
Difficult to review; QA starts prior to review being finalized English sites can’t be frozen
New content drops & hard delivery dates & phases overlap
Collaboration on review between business and linguistic reviewers
Track review feedback as bugs in QA
New unplanned content drops; Crunched schedules Missed application strings
Hard delivery dates
Insert into schedule somehow, causing L10n process steps to overlap

Testing Solutions

Test solutions involved a ton of testing and cross training of teams. All teams had to agree upon exit and success criteria, and nightly discussions, demos and meetings were held. The testing framework was as follows.

• Upon the completion of software i18n development, and functional testing
• Includes pseudo-localization testing
• Initial round performed by Lingoport
• Meetings and written guides to provide IT/QA teams ability to establish i18n testing in ongoing practices
• Linguistic verification by translation vendor
• In-context linguistic verification on staging server(s)
• On staging server(s)
• Trainings, demos, and nightly meetings
• Support testers with application knowledge, login credentials to reach content to test
• Small version of UAT with selected pilot team of business stakeholders
• Functional QA and of different scenarios
• Final review of localized content in context
• All stakeholders responsible of the final localized site

Results

In the first limited globalized release for the Chinese and Japanese marketplaces, the Japanese localized content became the 9th highest ranked in total Partner Central pageviews, which Chinese was ranked 17th, respectfully, within the first month of launch. Previously, the total page views ranked less than 1% each for these countries.
An increase in traffic translates to increased number of transactions and deal registrations, stipulating the goal for proven ROI for the globalization of Partner Central and further language support.

About VMware

VMware has over 400K customers and 95% of Fortune 1000 CO’s, and is a global leader in virtualization and cloud infrastructure, delivering customer-proven solutions that accelerate IT by reducing complexity and enabling more flexible, agile service delivery.

  • Focus 1: Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)
  • Focus 2: Hybrid Cloud
  • Focus 3: End User Computing (EUC)

Lingoport is dedicated to help companies reach their global readiness potential. Start a conversation with us about your project needs. We’ll be happy to enable and educate you on your i18n & L10n needs so you can be assured your products are ready for world markets.

Lingoport’s Internationalization Approach

Internationalization tools and software localization project scheduleYou’ve just received a request to prepare your software for sales opportunities in China, Japan and Germany. Your code base is large, maybe you don’t even know how large, but it’s had years of development. The question is how do you tackle the problem and successfully internationalize your code without expensive surprises and delays? Regardless of the size of your code base or what technologies you use, several key actions must be performed in order to create a product that works elegantly anywhere in the world. This document summarizes those actions and how Lingoport’s Globalyzer software, a leading software internationalization tool, enable seamless internationalization of code and long term maintenance.

Planning and Requirements

Internationalization projects can be strategic, tactical or both, depending upon the impetus to perform the effort. Whether internationalization is being pursued as an immediate response to a client opportunity or as a long planned effort to reach new clients in foreign lands can determine the pace, phasing and scope of internationalization. The easiest markets to internationalize for are countries with locale requirements which can be supported using ISO-Latin 1 character sets. These include Western European countries, the Americas, Australia and more. Bi-directional languages, such as Arabic and Hebrew have their own challenges. It can get one step more complicated to support Eastern European locales and further challenging to support “double-byte” languages such as Japanese, Chinese and Korean, using Unicode (though Unicode support should become part of your eventual, if not immediate internationalization plans). The right phasing will depend on a company’s opportunities, technologies and limitations.

Locale support requirements will also affect application logic and formatting. This includes I18n issues such as phone numbers, addresses, dates, times, sorting orders, units of measurement, currencies and more.

Locale selection and application behavior also needs to be defined. For example, is the user’s locale being selected based on the browser setting, or based on account preferences? Does a user need to access or enter data in more than one language?

Technologies from programming languages to databases and third party products will have their differences in how they support locale and character sets.

Creating an internationalization architectural document and project plan, gives the development team a clear roadmap while accounting for requirements and technologies. It also provides a resource that can be followed throughout a product’s lifecycle.

Database Refactoring

Often the first area we will address is migrating the database to the chosen encoding and multi-locale schema. This usually has far reaching implications for many software applications, touching upon how data is stored and retrieved.

String Identification and Externalization

Strings that are embedded in source code and will be seen by a product user, in most business cases, will have to be extracted from the code so they may be translated, and then the corresponding string must be presented to the user depending upon locale selection. However, there are lots of strings in your software that are really debug statements, database queries and the like, which will never be seen by a user, much less ever need to be translated. You have to sift though your code for what you need, and eliminate what you don’t. Then you have the process of externalizing all the strings. That’s slow and tedious work without the right tools and process.

Refactoring of Locale-limiting Methods/Functions and Web Page Encoding

Chances are that all through your code there are methods/functions and pages that won’t properly support your locale requirements. Issues can include support for character encoding, date/time/number fixed formats and the like. These have to be identified and fixed.

Third Party Products

Often software can include the use of third party products that may be used for anything from data input/output, graphics, reporting and more. Third party products need to be researched for any character corruption or locale limitations they may cause, and then rectified. This area can particularly cause surprises, as support isn’t always as claimed.

Testing

You need a way to test your application, without requiring your engineers to speak all your target languages. You need a plan and set of procedures to simulate supporting your new locale requirements.

Lingoport’s Approach

Lingoport offers both knowledgeable internationalization architects and engineers while also being the developers of Globalyzer, software for analyzing and performing internationalization efforts. By combining strong analysts with Globalyzer, a leading software internationalization tool, you can attack internationalization challenges based on optimizing internationalization architecture together with comprehensively analyzing internationalization issues buried in your code.

Analysis, Architecture and Planning

Our first step is to meet with your team, including product managers, marketing staff, developers and management to evaluate and develop requirements and plans. Simultaneously, we analyze your source code using Globalyzer, giving us a clear count of internationalization issues that will have to be rectified. We can then apply our metrics, both architectural changes needed and Globalyzer measurements, to accurately estimate internationalization development tasks.

Development

During development construction, we actively use Globalyzer to speed up finding and fixing issues in code, including a wide range of programming languages and even database scripts. Our engineers have strong successful experience internationalizing all kinds of software, which makes the work move along well. We can also parallelize our work with your development team using Globalyzer’s client/server architecture to help us coordinate our efforts together.

Testing

During testing we use Globalyzer’s PseudoJudo to “pad” strings in resource files with target locale characters, enabling developers to test that all UI strings have been externalized, characters are properly rendered, fonts work properly and UI layouts expand as needed based on language requirements. We work with your team to make sure testing goes smoothly so that your product works exactly as expected.

Ongoing Internationalization Support

To support internationalization as an ongoing requirement for all new product development, Globalyzer can be used in command-line mode as an automated process, measuring and reporting on any new internationalization issues that may be inadvertently introduced into code. Furthermore, our internationalization architectural documents serve as an important design reference for locale support for your product lifecycle.

Please to discuss your next project.