Worldware Demo Derby: Globalization

Last month, four companies assembled at the Worldware Conference to discuss their innovative global products. In this rapid-fire presentation, Sagan with GCMS, Lingoport, acrolinx and RIGI present a quick overview of their products in just ten minutes.

Presented by:

  • Jeff Kent, serving in various roles with Sajan
  • Olivier Libouban, senior project manager with Lingoport
  • Kent Taylor, senior vice president and founder of acrolinx
  • Daniel Goldschmidt, of RIGI Localization Solutions
Presentation time notes:
  • Lingoport-> 0:00-10:00
  • acrolinx-> 10:00-26:00
  • Sajan-> 26:00-37:00
  • RIGI-> 37:00-50:00
  • Questions->50:00-end

Worldware Presentation – Product Internationalization: The Pursuit for Cultural Adaptation (and happiness!)

People across the world are wired differently. With this being the case, it is important to design products specific to the intended locale. A mis-internationalized product will become confusing for its market, resulting in a loss in investment for the project. Follow along with Talia Baruch (below) goes over how to hit home, literally and figuratively, with internationalized and localized products.

Presented by:

  • Talia Baruch – An independent globalization strategist with 12+ years of localization experience working with clients like Google, HP, Adobe, Cisco and Starbucks to achieve highly successful localized products. Recently founded Copyous, a provider of internationalization and localization setup management.

Internationalization and Medical Translations

Recently, Adam Asnes of Lingoport and Andres Heuberger of ForeignExchange Translations sat down over a cup of coffee and discussed how one can expect to see a return on investment after internationalization and how i18n can be utilized by the medical field. It is interesting to note that the medical field is one of the last fields to be internationalized due to liability issues.

 

Agile Challenges for Localization

This article was originally featured in the Jan./Feb. 2011 issue of MultiLingual Computing Magazine, in Adam Asnes’ Business Side column. Read article “Agile Challenges” on MultiLingual’s Website.

A Hot Topic

Agile development is such a hot topic these days because it represents a change in how software is developed. More specifically, it has proven successful in producing highly productive results. It has a lot of developers very excited, and at this point, it’s hardly going away. That’s why back at Localization World Seattle in October, I was disappointed that a featured panel discussion about localization and agile development seemed to be more about the frustration of how three-week development sprints are incompatible with large localization efforts. I understand both sides of this argument, but I think the opportunity and consequently the impact on software localization practices here are potentially exciting.

Let’s step back a bit and look a little at the business and process drivers for agile. For those not following software development, agile is a management process with narrow and reduced scope that breaks down tasks into smaller efforts, where the object is to make product development advances in short cycles, typically three-week sprints. At the end of the three weeks, there can be a new release, or not, but agile cycles do result in more releases over far shorter periods of time than have been traditional in software production. This is exciting for development teams, even on an individual level for the very human reason that it’s really cool to build new stuff and see it come to fruition without getting caught in organizational planning and task bottlenecks. It’s even better for the customers, as they get new features faster, without having to wait for monumental releases that used to only happen perhaps once or twice a year.

There are all kinds of other benefits, and a quick search will teach you the basic concepts.

Internationalization and Agile

Internationalization is really just a part of the software development process. Hence, it can fit into agile quite nicely, at least in the case of ongoing internationalization as part of an already internationalized product. In the case of internationalizing legacy code, usually a separate code branching effort is required, and the cycle will be quite different than typical sprint-feature development.

For ongoing development, internationalization has to be understood as meaning more than just embedding strings. Every programming language and architecture have potential unique functional issues relating to internationalization. This is where measuring with static analysis tools gives you good assessment and ongoing metrics data rather than just relying on iterative, limited testing. There is a business and process value to knowing your product is internationalized, and that never gets finished, especially with agile, as there is so much new rapid development combined with less dependency on formal design.

Localization and Agile

The process of localization as it has been simply can’t comfortably keep up with agile release cycles. The challenge is that it’s very possible that new feature strings for translation might not be finalized until late in a sprint, and then they have to be compared for context with the rest of the application and perhaps translated into a multitude of languages, with new language packs and installers needing creation and testing. Localization likely just does not fit into that initial sprint. It follows that localization may have to be broken up into demonstrable sections. Some locales could possibly take precedence. In many cases, individual sprints will not result in large changes or word counts to the interface, but these sprints must be localization managed. It would be important to include developers in localization process awareness. Giving a localization manager advanced notice of what’s coming is a simple, low-cost place to start. Another solution is to aggregate releases for localization events, which will significantly lag behind development. Think of it as a waterfall process managed by agile methods. That is not exactly ideal for customers depending on those localizations, and they lose faster access to new features that agile enables. Plus it creates a competitive opportunity.

  • Why should customers outside of the home market have to wait for three or four sprints? I’d recommend a clear plan to demonstrate that you aren’t falling behind too far. So what’s an agile, but globally-focused company to do?
  • Educate the teams with the business, process and technical opportunities and ramifications of internationalization and localization. Start with the product owner (such as a product manager). This person leads features and release schedules. Confirm marketing and business impact of internationalization and localization. Confirm internationalization standards and requirements. Organize the localization backlog and release schedule, mapped to various sprints.
  • Have a scrum master. This person manages the actual work produced by developers during sprint efforts. Make sure he or she is aware of global requirements and processes per the product owner. Bring localization manager(s) into scrum planning. Include internationalization criteria in development and testing. Measure internationalization with tools, not just by mucking about with a few screens. Get new strings to the localization manager as soon as possible.
  • Have the localization manager work on creating internationalization and localization design patterns, which should be clear and reusable for sprint efforts. Track terminology and help developers with consistency of content creation in the interface and documentation. Perhaps a reach, but at least build in time for content review.
  • In documentation, consider tools such as acrolinx to help make descriptions more localizable, rather than reinventing descriptions over and over.
  • Consider new ways to see application translation in context, rather than the traditional list of strings. There are new tools coming to the market that emphasize product context views of translations. They are more applicable to browser based and multitiered applications than traditional tools that are limited to client applications. Some of the crowd-sharing site translation efforts are using early forms of this technology. Getting a contextual view drastically reduces the time and burden of linguistic context testing.
  • Work with a localization company that understands and can move quickly with you. I’ve seen considerable differentiation among localization companies in regard to understanding development processes. The best partners are capable of enhancing your planning.

Conclusion

All of these efforts will take time, money and a focused initiative. That’s how it is with change. The move to agile took investment in training, new process thinking and tools. In many companies, localization has been an afterthought to development, but as global revenues command more of a company’s profits, the strategic and tactical efforts of internationalization and localization must catch up. Likewise, localization professionals will be charged with leading the effort, requiring them to contribute with ideas and improvements.

About the Author

Adam Asnes is President and CEO at Lingoport and enjoys investigating how globalization technology affects businesses expanding their worldwide reach. Adam is a sought after speaker at industry events and a columnist on globalization technology as it affects businesses expanding their worldwide reach. He often writes articles for localization, internationalization and globalization industry publications and enjoys cycling and Colorado’s Rocky Mountains; he can be reached by clicking here.

Lingoport’s Internationalization (i18n) and Localization (L10n) Tools and Consulting Solutions

Founded in 2001, Lingoport provides extensive software localization and internationalization consulting services. Lingoport’s Globalyzer software, a market leading software internationalization tool, helps entire enterprises and development teams to effectively internationalize existing and newly developed source code and to prepare their applications for localization.

For more information on how Lingoport can assist you with all of your internationalization and localization needs, please contact us at info@lingoport.com, call 303.444.8020, or contact us here.

Palo Alto Localization Technology Round Table

The Palo Alto Localization Technology Roundtable on Thursday, Feb. 3rd, 2011 brings together 5 industry leaders to present an open technology framework that speeds up time to market and drastically reduces your localization and translation costs.

Together, Lingoport, acrolinx, Clay Tablet, Milengo and Asia Online will show how advanced, modular localization technology addresses the… challenges faced when launching products or services to international markets in multiple languages.

You’ll learn the key considerations when taking an international product from design to launch through, Internationalization, Information Authoring, Content Management, Localization and Translation Automation.

And you’ll learn how this is achievable quickly, and with fewer resources, while maintaining a consistent brand and user experience that builds value, saves time and reduces costs.

You will also:

* Access a wealth of localization experience from industry experts
* Discover new technologies and new ways of working that are already changing the localization landscape
* Learn strategies that can streamline your localization efforts and help you quickly launch products worldwide
* Share information with like-minded peers and learn proven practices that you’ll find nowhere else

The Localization Technology Round Table event is free of charge, open to customer-side industry professionals and will be held at the Crowne Plaza Cabana Hotel, 4290 El Camino Real, in Palo Alto, CA 94306.

Palo Alto Localization Technology Round Table

The Best Conversations Happen When The Right People Get Together

What: Localization Technology Round Table
When: Thursday, Feb. 3rd, 2011
Where: Crowne Plaza Cabana Hotel, 4290 El Camino Real, in Palo Alto, CA 94306
Cost: Free
Open to: Customer-side industry professionals
Event Facilitator: Erin Vang, GlobalPragmatica

The Palo Alto Localization Technology Round Table on Thursday, Feb. 3rd, 2011 brings together 5 industry leaders to present an open technology framework that speeds up time to market and drastically reduces your localization and translation costs.

Together, Lingoport, acrolinx, Clay Tablet, Milengo and Asia Online will show how advanced, modular localization technology addresses the challenges faced when launching products or services to international markets in multiple languages.

You’ll learn the key considerations when taking an international product from design to launch through, Internationalization, Information Authoring, Content Management, Localization and Translation Automation.

And you’ll learn how this is achievable quickly, and with fewer resources, while maintaining a consistent brand and user experience that builds value, saves time and reduces costs.

You will also:

  • Access a wealth of localization experience from industry experts
  • Discover new technologies and new ways of working that are already changing the localization landscape
  • Learn strategies that can streamline your localization efforts and help you quickly launch products worldwide
  • Share information with like-minded peers and learn proven practices that you’ll find nowhere else

The Localization Technology Round Table event is free of charge, open to customer-side industry professionals and will be held at the Crowne Plaza Cabana Hotel, 4290 El Camino Real, in Palo Alto, CA 94306.

Agenda

8:30 – 9:00am: Continental Breakfast and Networking

9:00 – 9:15am: Introduction

Erin Vang, GlobalPragmatica

9:15 – 9:30am: Keynote

Salvatore Giammarresi, Localization Director at Yahoo!

9:30 – 10:00am: Machine Translation Technology Integration by Kirti Vashee of Asia Online
A leader in Translation Technology shows how Machine Translation can make a huge impact on localization productivity delivering more words, faster and at a lower average cost.

You’ll learn:

  • How the real time content model is set to change the localization landscape and how MT is poised to address this challenge.
  • How MT can enable new kinds of projects never considered before, including those with millions of words.
  • How large volume MT projects can facilitate rapid market expansion

acrolinx

10:00 – 10:30am: Information Quality Management Solutions by Kent Taylor of acrolinx
The world’s leading provider of Information Quality Management Solutions will show how to deliver quality product and technical information faster and for less money, despite time-to-market pressures, insufficient editing staff, and rapidly changing technology.

You’ll learn:

  • How to save 15% – 25% on translation costs with quality source content
  • What you need to know to improve your processes today
  • Quality Management in the Information Development Environment

Lingoport - Software Internationalization (I18n) tools and technology

10:30 – 11:00am: Software Internationalization Best Practices by Adam Asnes of Lingoport
A leader in software internationalization solutions introduces the challenge of taking a complex software/hardware product to market in multiple languages. Lingoport will show how internationalization at the earliest stages of product design results in gains in efficiency and cost reductions further down the localization value chain.

You’ll learn:

  • How to make your software work in all languages
  • Why translation is crucial to sales success
  • How internationalization drives efficiency in the localization value chain

11:00 – 11:15am – Refreshment break

Clay Tablet

11:15 – 11:45am: Content Management, Customer Relationship Management and Product Information Management System Integration by Robinson Kelly of Clay Tablet
A leader in localization efficiency solutions shows how automated translation processes make it simple to deliver product support and technical content from any Content Management, Customer Relationship Management or Product Information Management system and deliver significant reductions in localization costs and time to market.

You’ll learn:

  • How Business Information Systems can be leveraged to deliver multilingual content.
  • How sending content for translation is easy and hassle free
  • How an automated workflow improves time to market and reduces costs when launching international products.

Milengo

11:45am – 12:15pm: Localization and Translation Best Practices by Adam Blau Rebellion Leader at Milengo
A global provider of language services to Fortune 500 companies shows how multi-language vendors blend advanced localization workflows and technology to deliver multi-language translations quicker and, at a lower cost.

You’ll learn:

  • How rapid market expansion requires rapid translation results
  • Why human translation is important and the areas it really makes a difference
  • How machines and humans can work together to tackle large volume multi language projects

12:15 – 12:30pm: Q&A and Closing

12:30 – 1:30pm: Lunch and Networking

Afternoon Optional

The second part of the Roundtable consists of three rounds of product demos.  You’ll also have the opportunity to speak individually with any of the presenters to answer your questions and discuss how the concepts covered can benefit you:

Lingoport Globalyzer Demonstration

Lingoport will demonstrate finding and fixing internationalization issues with Globalyzer, as well as setting up projects and supporting internationalization across development teams. They will demonstrate with source code using multiple programming languages from a variety of open source projects.

acrolinx Product Demonstration

acrolinx will demonstrate how to manage your corporate content quality with an easy to use tool that plugs in to most authoring environments.  They will demonstrate how to manage corporate style, terminology and tone to save on translation costs, improve global SEO and deliver high quality information to customers.

Clay Tablet Technologies CMS Demonstration

Clay Tablet Technologies will demonstrate the ease with which content can be sent from any CMS to your translation provider, reducing manual effort and errors while speeding the time to market for translated content. Attendees will learn about the key integration points at the CMS level and can discuss the pros and cons of various integration strategies.

Asia Online Language Studio Pro Demonstration

Asia Online will provide a basic overview of the Language Studio Pro platform and show how the translation quality metrics and basic translation is done in the platform.  A brief overview of the many data analysis and data preparation tools will also be provided.

1:30-2:00pm: Product demo Round 1

2:00-2:30pm: Product demo Round 2

2:30-3:00pm: Product demo Round 3

3:00-3:15: Roundtable Wrap-up

After Roundtable Wrap-up until 6:00: Time to network and mingle.Join us for a reception and happy hour at the hotel bar.

Round Table Facilitator

Erin Vang

Erin Vang - GlobalPragmaticaErin Vang, PMP, is Principal Pragmatist with Global Pragmatica LLC®, which offers facilitative leadership for technical audiences. She has over twenty years of experience in statistical software documentation, quality assurance, project management, and localization, most recently as International Program Manager for the JMP Research and Development at SAS, and previously with Abacus Concepts and SYSTAT. Vang holds degrees in music performance and math, is a PMI-certified Project Management Professional, and has extensive training in facilitative leadership and conflict resolution. She writes a regular column for Multilingual magazine and is in much demand as a speaker, event moderator, and facilitator.

Speakers

Salvatore Giammarresi
Localization Director at Yahoo!

Salvatore GiammarresiSalvatore Giammarresi is Localization Director at Yahoo! responsible for global corporate localization strategy, localization vendor management, localization processes and localization tools. Previously he was Vice President of Products at HomeGain.com; an independent localization consultant; Director of International Product Management at Homestore.com; Senior Localization Manager at Kana Software; and Engineering Program Manager at Electronics for Imaging. Salvatore holds a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from the University of Palermo (Italy) where he has been a Visiting Professor teaching localization, computer assisted translation tools and global product marketing and management. He is the author of a University- level textbook on CAT tools and has published several papers on localization and applied linguistics.

Adam Blau
Rebellion Leader at Milengo

Adam BlauAdam Blau joined Milengo during its conceptual phase, assisting with the research and development of the company’s localization alliance model. Adam is now responsible for managing milengo’s sales and marketing activities in North America and Europe, helping companies take advantage of the alliance structure in their localization planning. A native of San Francisco, California, he has lived in Berlin, Germany, for the past four years and recently relocated back to the Washington, DC. area.

Kent Taylor
General Manager at acrolinx

Kent TaylorKent Taylor defines himself as a Recovering Pubs Director and a 30-year enterprise publishing veteran, experienced in all aspects of information development and delivery, with a strong focus on people, process, technology, and quality. And, he is always seeking the Holy Grail: cost, quality, and timeliness – all at the same time!

Kirti Vashee
Vice President of Enterprise Translation Sales at Asia Online

Kirti VasheeKirti Vashee is a seasoned sales and marketing executive of technology products who has built a reputation as an evangelist for SMT technology. He has been a prominent and accomplished speaker on automated translation technology in a variety of localization and globalization technology focused conferences around the world.

Robinson Kelly
CEO & Founder of Clay Tablet Technologies

Robinson KellyRobinson is a technology entrepreneur and business start-up veteran. Clay Tablet is the fourth start-up technology company he’s been involved with over the past 15 years, including, working in Silicon Valley launching a content management firm. Robinson is now responsible for the sustained growth of the company by driving strategy, managing major partnerships, setting goals and directing the team.


Adam Asnes
President & CEO of Lingoport

Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001 after seeing firsthand that the niche for software globalization engineering products and services was underserved in the localization industry. Adam AsnesLingoport helps globally focused technology companies adapt their software for worldwide markets with expert internationalization and localization consulting and Globalyzer software. Globalyzer, a market leading software internationalization tool, helps entire enterprises and development teams to effectively internationalize existing and newly developed source code and to prepare their applications for localization.

Lingoport and Foreign Exchange Translations Webinar: Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application

Internationalization and localization for medical products tends to have special case business drivers and can take on life-and-death importance. First, there’s adapting products for better worldwide sales, but often issues like reducing liabilities and saving lives drive the process just a bit differently.

Join us for an interactive one-hour online presentation as Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Andres Heuberger, CEO of Foreign Exchange Translations, discuss basic principles and processes that make medical products different.

Webinar: “Internationalizing and Localizing a Medical Software Application”
Date: Thursday, December 16th, 2010
Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PT
Where: Your desktop
Watch at: https://vimeo.com/17898099
Cost: Complimentary
Presenters: Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, and Andres Heuberger, CEO of Foreign Exchange Translations

We’ll discuss product architectures, testing and solutions to verify functional and linguistic accuracy; we’ll also take an in-depth look at:

This event targets global manufacturers of medical device, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and healthcare products, including: localization managers, internationalization managers, software developers, engineers, engineering managers, information developers, and senior executives responsible for international market share as well as customer-side professionals involved in the translation and localization of medical and life sciences content.

Lingoport Webinar: Supporting Internationalization Across Your Enterprise With Globalyzer 3.4

Recording Available Below

There is tremendous value in knowing if a product is global-ready as part of your development cycle. Large amounts of development, marketing and branding dollars are at stake. Yet often, the only way software gets verified for localization, is during the localization process itself, or based on a limited series of manual interface testing. That’s way too late in the development cycle to be efficient and a very incomplete way to address the issue.

There are all kinds of products to support issues like software security and efficiency, but how about checking on internationalization, which for many companies is a hefty and vital product requirement for a good share of company revenue?

In this webinar, we’ll be demonstrating how Globalyzer 3.4 (our new release) finds, categorizes, tracks and helps fix internationalization bugs in source code using static analysis.

Webinar: “Supporting Internationalization Across Your Enterprise With Globalyzer 3.4”
Date: Tuesday, November 30th, 2010
Time:
11am – Noon PST
Where:
Your desktop
Watch at:
http://vimeo.com/17364680
Cost: ComplimentaryPresenters: Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport

We’ll start with some source code and then:

  • Analyze it for internationalization issues
  • Customize “rule-sets” so that specific issues to that code can be address
  • Show how that information can be accessed and shared among development team members
  • Integrate automated Globalyzer static analysis via command line
  • Support testing initiatives

The Webinar targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone facing ongoing software globalization and localization challenges.

Note: We’ll be diving straight into coding issues and will be skipping internationalization basics. If you’re looking for a presentation on internationalization and localization basics, please visit this archived presentation from Localization World: http://vimeo.com/16345751

About the presenters:
Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001 after seeing firsthand that the niche for software globalization engineering products and services was underserved in the localization industry. As Lingoport’s President and CEO, he focuses on sales and marketing alliances while maintaining oversight of the company’s internationalization services engineering and Globalyzer product development.

Olivier Libouban, a native of France, has been working for 25 years in the software industry, for large corporations and start-ups, as a software engineer and as a project manager. Olivier has a wide ranging experience in the US, France, Switzerland, and Norway, in R&D departments as well as for client projects of all sizes with complex software environments.

The Need for Internationalization (i18n) in Administrative Solutions: A Case in Point with Region Centre

By Olivier Libouban, Software Project Manager at Lingoport.

A Region is an administrative layer in France, with elected officials, getting tax Euros, and setting up programs and initiatives for the EiffleTowercitizens. Part of the responsibility of any region is also to provide software solutions to the citizens. Part of the responsibility of any region is also to provide software solutions to the citizens, with significant budgets: the IT department of any Region manages bids, responses, and supervises the implementation of the solutions.

A case in point for “Region Centre”, situated close south west of Paris, is the need for an e-learning platform, dealing amongst other things with budgets, financial institutions, training institutions and citizens able to register and follow classes, either on-site or on-line. The request for proposal of such programs is sent by the IT department and gives the context, the functional needs, and the requirements at large for this type of program, including strategic technologies, such as Portal by a specific vendor. The entire platform may be composed of a large number of software components, in this case ranging from the software infrastructure pieces, such as Web application server, LDAP, and databases, to specific functional components, such as an e-learning tool to be integrated in the overall software and hardware platform.

The IT department oversees the responses to the request, and solutions which do not play in a French locale cannot be accepted. All components must behave and interact with each other, be it in terms of encoding, of searches, of collation, of UI presentation to citizens, training institutions, financing institutions, administrators of the system. In other words, the budgets for an administrative program are targeted at i18n compliant software.

Those administrative programs might be at a city level, a county level, a region level, a national level, even at a pan-national level, such as with the European Union, which serves citizens of Europe at large. The combined budgets of those IT departments are simply very large and can only be applied to i18n solutions.

Video Recording of LocalizationWorld Presentation: Intro to Internationalization and Localization

Internationalization and Localization experts Adam Asnes, of Lingoport, and Angelika Zerfaß, of zaac, recently presented at LocWorld in Seattle. Their session “Intro to Internationalization and Localization” was moderated by Daniel Goldschmidt, principal consultant and cofounder of RIGI Localization Solutions, and is now available for online viewing.

The one-hour recording of their presentation provides an overview over the different areas in internationalization and localization projects where best practices exist — starting from the concept of internationalization and how it is applied to project management dos and don’ts and the tools and technologies used in the field.