Shifting Left in Software Internationalization

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Traditionally software internationalization and localization is performed after development is complete, or if your organization is advanced, at least late in the development process. But what happens when you have systems and processes to make localization a core supported value for your development mission? We already have significant technologies in place to improve translation quality and speed. The improvement opportunity is to shift focus to the left into development and QA, making internationalization a priority for faster, better and less iterative global releases.

In this one-hour online session, Lingoport will demonstrate how Globalyzer 4.0 (in beta now) supports internationalization concurrent with new development and QA. Learn how Globalyzer, the leading internationalization product, supports your global market objectives.

Webinar: “Shifting Left – A Methodical Approach to Achieve Global Readiness”
Time and Date: Join us Tuesday, February 21st at 11am PT
Recording: View webinar recording below
Presenters: Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport

Who will benefit from attending this session:

  • Program and Product Managers
  • Director and senior level managers
  • Localization managers and leaders

Presenters:
Adam Asnes, Lingoport’s CEO & President
Olivier Libouban, Globalization Lead at Lingoport


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Shifting Focus Within Globalization

Shifting Left: Moving the Productivity Pendulum Focus Within Globalization

During my first week of customer visits in Silicon Valley with Lingoport, we were fortunate to visit some of the most respected and sophisticated globalization departments at leading enterprises in the area. Many, if not most, derive more than 50% of their profits from abroad, and consider globalization a core mission in their company. As you can imagine, many were early implementers of translation management systems, machine translation (either in-house or LSP-side), visual localization tools and setup well-oiled centralized localization groups to streamline their own activities, shorten release cycles and produce greater value from their language service providers.

It should be no surprise then when I repeat a common theme we hear not only during from our visit, but from customers in general: enterprises now want to investigate with greater vigor how to expand, or shift, their focus from localization-only productivity gains to streamlined internationalization (i18n) processes and compliance within software development.

Globalization, within the context of software, is often defined as internationalization and localization. By shifting the emphasis left, the focus places greater importance on ensuring software code is i18n compliant before localization and QA, and not after as is currently often the case. Companies are beginning to understand the cost/benefit analysis beyond localization productivity by reducing the number of costly L10n/testing iterations, ad-hoc testing, i18n bug fixing and delays to international revenue.

It makes inherent sense to me. Productivity gains have been tremendous in the world of localization. The industry has responded with solutions for the different types of content enterprises produce (web, KB’s, manuals, legal, etc.) and industry growth has been awesome. I don’t see in my crystal ball however any major innovations beyond better use of technology currently being explored, so the time to shift efforts left and explore the little understood world of i18n on localization, is now.

There are real costs associated to i18n bugs, which I didn’t know before I joined Lingoport. A common estimate is that a i18n bug for an organization supporting 20+ languages costs about $500. How about the extra resources required to fix them versus the delay on international revenue versus lack of resources for new product features and enhancements? It’s not easy to always quantify, but if you did as some customers of ours have done, you’d be very surprised at the money being spent.

Consider another perspective. A customer recently told me something to this affect: “It’s not just about ROI metrics. It’s being able to understand our own business, internal customers (developer/product teams) and proactively solve problems.”

The challenge faced by Globalization Departments is that software development is, almost without exception, not an activity that falls under their responsibility. Managing localization activities certainly is. Localization groups often receive content and resource files, localize, QA, report and deliver. In an Agile environment, they set schedules and align resources to meet iterations and schedules.

Rarely do they have influence, however, on how software developers create software, which environments they work in, or authority to force i18n guidelines on developers around the world on how to treat locale-sensitive methods, functions or classes in various programming languages. Some companies are successful in instituting some i18n process or awareness during development. Making i18n compliance a reality through many iterative QA cycles and releases is simply not efficient.

So what is a company to do? Here are some ideas on how you can start to shift left:

  1. Monitor internationalization status and activities over time and provide visibility on the number and type of i18n bugs your organization faces across products and groups. Calculate the cost of i18n bugs. Derive the workflow to find, fix and deliver bug fixes, from the hours your team member spends to fix them, to vendor costs, to delays in international revenue or product development. It will get the attention of senior management.
  2. Implement a tool and process that scans and evaluates the code provided from software development for i18n compliance before it goes to localization. Track the number of errors found and repeat #2.
  3. Provide reports, either in Waterfall or Agile environments, on the type of errors and where they can be found in the source code for development to re-take responsibility for i18n
  4. Provide a plug-in to the IDE of your software developers, such as Eclipse. It can alert them to i18n errors in real-time and greatly reduce QA and testing, as well as steps #3 and #4.
To summarize, the time maybe ripe for the localization industry to spread its wings and become true globalization groups in their respective enterprises. The past ten years have focused on optimizing processes and establishing localization workflows, both on the client and vendor-side, for all types of files, content and customer interactions. But the enabler of localization, that being internationalization, has been pushed to the wayside. Possible causes could be because it’s complicated, its expensive,  it’s hard to do and “we don’t own it.” But by taking on this challenge, it may just propel globalization stature, importance and visibility within the enterprise and industry as not seen before, something localization professionals have always wanted.

 

  • To understand in greater detail the intricacies of ensuring i18n compliance prior to localization and QA, attend our upcoming webinar Shifting Left on February 21 at 11am PST.

Taking Your Mobile Apps Global: Games and Mobile Internationalization and Localization

View Webinar Recording Below

  • A condensed audio version of the webinar is also available

The recent explosion in mobile and social game popularity has created a lucrative market, both domestically and abroad for game development. Often, however, mobile games and apps globalization quality and functional testing get overlooked due to the rush to market and an incomplete process for international development, leading to a dissatisfying gaming experience for users.

Smartphone and tablet usage will have surpassed usage of PC’s by years end, and by 2015 mobile commerce is expected to grow to $119bn. Further, forecasts show that the number of mobile users in emerging markets, such as China and India, will spike in coming years as users become more and more savvy. An international mobile and game strategy is no longer an option.

A number of issues go into games internationalization and localization, such as locale support in the code, language translation, culturalization and legal issues, all of which are unique to each target market. Are these issues affecting your efforts and do you have a strategy in place to combat these problems?

Danica Brinton, Principal of LocLabs, is our special guest in this interactive online session. Danica has built and lead significant globalization initiatives and teams at leading mobile and social companies. LocLabs has been involved in iPhone localization for five years and handles international product and production efforts for a number of mobile and social app developers. Check out Danica’s article: Confessions of a g11n Veteran – Social and Mobile Apps Globalization

Danica and Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport, will answer pre-submitted questions as well as questions from the live audience about the process of developing an international mobile and games production department in this 45-minute session.

Webinar: “Taking Your Mobile Apps Global: Games and Mobile i18n and L10n”
Time and Date: This webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, December 1st, 2011
Recording: View webinar recording below
Presenters: Danica Brinton of LocLabs and Adam Asnes of Lingoport

Danica and Adam will field questions on a number of topics, including:

  • What  strategy has Danica and LocLabs used for aggressively growing international presence for its social gaming clients?
  • How does an international production team operate?
  • What is the key to success of some of the international blockbuster social or mobile games?
  • Are there some fundamental differences in the approach to iOS vs. Android for globalization?

This presentation targets game developers, social and mobile developers, technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, linguistic leads, project managers, and anyone wanting to learn more about games internationalization and localization.

About Danica Brinton
Danica Brinton has held leadership positions in international product management, strategy and globalization at Zynga, Yahoo!, Second Life, Ask.com, and Apple, Inc. Currently, Danica runs her own company, LocLabs. LocLabs specializes in international product management, international strategy, localizability/i18n, localization, localization testing, content management, and international feature development. Read Danica’s article: Confessions of a g11n Veteran – Social and Mobile Apps Globalization

About Adam Asnes
Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001 after seeing firsthand that the niche for software globalization engineering products and services was underserved in the localization industry. As Lingoport’s President and CEO, he focuses on sales and marketing alliances while maintaining oversight of the company’s internationalization services engineering and Globalyzer product development. Adam is a frequent speaker and columnist on globalization technology as it affects businesses expanding their worldwide reach. For creative inspiration and fun, Adam enjoys cycling and Colorado’s Rocky Mountains.


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Justifying Software Globalization to Management

Perhaps you have a clear or developing business case for software internationalization (i18n) and localization (L10n), but the process is slow and you are having trouble justifying the cost and what’s involved for i18n and L10n to management.

Is the lack of a definitive internationalization/localization process slowing your department down? Are you in a position where you need to explain to management how much time-to-market is wasted by a late international release, or quantifying globalization of your software application?

In this one hour online session, Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel and Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport, provide useful information on how you can get buy-in from management to support your internationalization and localization efforts.

Webinar: “Justifying Software Globalization to Management”
Date: This webinar was originally held on Thursday, September 15, 2011
Recording: View webinar recording below
Presenters: Loic Dufresne de Virel, Localization Strategist at Intel and Adam Asnes, Founder & CEO of Lingoport

Loic and Adam discuss a number of topics, including:

  • How would management be affected if you failed to meet quarterly expectations internationally due to a lack of understanding between developers and localization caused by an unclear i18n/L10n process?
  • How much time (and money) is spent on bug fixing? And what exactly is an i18n bug?
  • How to create an internationalization plan.
  • How to lower overall cost by establishing a stable QA process.
  • How to managing the internationalization process.
  • How to present numbers and strategies to management in a clear and concise manner, and much more.

This presentation targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone wanting to learn more on how to streamline the software globalization process.

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Webinar: Justifying Software Internationalization to Management

The business case for internationalization is clear: companies have to sell to customers who are buying –> international customers present good buying opportunities –> products must be adapted to sell to international customers. Great, grand, wonderful (no yelling on the bus)! It all sounds so easy, doesn’t it? Well if it were all so easy, we would be spending 50 weeks per year on vacation and two weeks per year working. This is not the case.

Companies get bogged down in discussing costs, implementation and justification of all things, including internationalization. This inspired us to develop a webinar on how to justify internationalization to management. We have heard questions from customers about how the lack of a definitive i18n/L10n process is slowing their department down, but they don’t have the numbers, the raw data to quantify the use of tools to aid the process.

The webinar is free of charge, more info:

Adam will discuss a number of topics, including:

  • How would management be affected if you failed to meet quarterly expectations internationally due to a lack of understanding between developers and localization caused by an unclear i18n/L10n process?
  • How much time (and money) is spent on bug fixing? And what exactly is an i18n bug?
  • How to create an internationalization plan.
  • How to lower overall cost by establishing a stable QA process.
  • How to managing the internationalization process.
  • How to present numbers and strategies to management in a clear and concise manner, and much more.
If you are unable to attend, a recording of the webinar will be made available following the event. Follow @Lingoport to receive updates.

International Product Development – Brand Culturalization

Folks across the globe are wired differently. Therefore, in international product development, it is key to design and market a product brand with an eye on cultural adaptation to regional markets. Get a competitive edge. And keep it. At the speed of need. A product unlocalized is a product unsold. An ROI unreaped.

This one-hour presentation is a roller coaster ride through pains and gains in the pre-natal product development process. We’ll review contextual, functional and visual elements to consider for producing a culturally fitted product brand and resurface just in time for a quick peek into glocal strategy for product acceptance in new market entry.

Webinar: “Product Brand Culturalization”
Date and Time: This webinar was originally held on Thursday, August 25, 2011
Presenters: Talia Baruch, Localization & Culturalization Consultant, Copyous and Chris Raulf, Marketing Director, Lingoport

Talia and Chris will also discuss the challenges companies face when deciding to take their brand global. The presentation features several case studies and an in-depth look at the relationship between branding and the needs of the global marketplace, including culture, localization, and internationalization.

This presentation targets business managers, marketing managers, product managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone else wanting to learn more about the product localization, internationalization, and culturalization process.

About the Presenters:
Talia Baruch is an independent localization and culturalization consultant, founder of Copyous. Talia has 23 years of experience in the industry, developing and orchestrating enterprise localization accounts, including Google, HP, Adobe, and Starbucks. Her added expertise lies in culturally-fitted brand identity and in glocal strategy for new market entry. Talia can be reached on LinkedIn @ http://www.linkedin.com/in/taliabaruch, and on Twitter @TaliaBaruch.

Chris Raulf, a native of Switzerland, is a 12-year veteran of the localization and internationalization industry. He started his professional career as a Marketing Specialist for a financial corporation in Zürich, Switzerland and as a Product Manager for the Swiss Rail Ways, one of Switzerland’s trademark companies. Chris earned a Swiss Federal Diploma in Business and Marketing and traveled all over the world before settling in the US. He currently heads marketing at Lingoport.


Click here to download Chris’ presentation on product brand culturalization, i18n, and L10n.

Software Development and Localization: Bridging the Gap

So, you’ve developed a new software application, and have high aspirations in terms of selling your application to a global audience. Now what? Problems often arise between developers, localization managers, and business managers due to perceived lack of support, time, and money.

This lack of understanding can lead to great frustration within the development tiers. Join us for an hour long online panel discussion and learn how some of the best known industry thought leaders are contributing to bridging the gap between software development and localization.

The panel features the following industry thought leaders and experts from the software development, content development, internationalization, and localization industries:

  • Val Swisher, Founder & CEO of Content Rules
  • Danica Brinton, Senior Director of International at Zynga
  • Dale Schultz, Globalization Test Architect at IBM
  • Edwin Hoogerbeets, Senior Internationalization Engineer at Palm
  • Adam Asnes, CEO & President of Lingoport

Online Panel Discussion: “Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization”
Date and Times: This webinar was originally held on Wednesday, August 3rd
Webinar recording: Request the recording of this webinar by completing the form at the bottom of this page

Erin Vang, Owner of GlobalPragmatica will be facilitating the online panel discussion. Erin has over twenty years of expe­ri­ence in sta­tis­ti­cal soft­ware doc­u­men­ta­tion, qual­ity assur­ance, project man­age­ment, and local­iza­tion, most recently as Inter­na­tional Pro­gram Man­ager for the JMP Research and Devel­op­ment at SAS, and pre­vi­ously with Aba­cus Con­cepts and SYSTAT.

This presentation is intended for technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, technical writers, content developers, and anyone wanting to learn more on how to optimize their global software releases.

We’d love to hear from you. Please send any questions or topics you’d like to have discussed during this panel to Chris Raulf @ chris (at) lingoport.com.


Click here to download the “Bridging the Gap Between Software Development and Localization” slides in .pdf format.

Is your software product internationalized? A New Way to Keep Score

It’s finally become fairly common knowledge that for the best results, you need to internationalize before you localize code. But internationalization requirements can be difficult to articulate, negotiating locale can be error prone and it’s easy and expensive for internationalization errors to slip all the way through to release.

In our interactions with many globally-savvy development and localization organizations, it’s clear that there’s a need for systems to evaluate, monitor and track internationalization status and progress over time. This is particularly emphasized with fast release cycles, geographically distributed development teams and the important and emphasis on growing global revenues.

In this one hour webinar, you will learn how the new Globalyzer Internationalization Score Card provides mechanism to report on the status of your internationalization efforts and how to tailor an i18n Score Card template to your specific project requirements.

The Score Card leverages Lingoport’s i18n tool Globalyzer, a client/server software system which helps entire teams find, fix and monitor internationalization issues in their source code. Globalyzer identifies and reports in a wide variety of programming languages and helps entire development teams internationalize source code, both initially and as an integral part of future releases.

Webinar: “Is it Internationalized? A New Way to Keep Score”
Date and Time: This webinar was originally held on Thursday, June 16, 2011
Webinar recording: See Below

Presenters: Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban of Lingoport

In this online session, Adam Asnes and Olivier Libouban will provide a general overview of the Score Card template and also discuss:

  • The Internationalization Score Card setup and analyst input.
  • Using Globalyzer in the Internationalization Score Card.
  • The Internationalization Score Card utilities.
  • A workflow to integrate the Internationalization Score Card in a continuous integration environment, and more.

The webinar targets technical managers, software engineers, test engineering managers, QA managers, internationalization and localization managers, and anyone facing ongoing software globalization and internationalization challenges.

About the presenters:
Adam Asnes founded Lingoport in 2001 after seeing firsthand that the niche for software globalization engineering products and services was underserved in the localization industry. As Lingoport’s President and CEO, he focuses on sales and marketing alliances while maintaining oversight of the company’s internationalization services engineering and Globalyzer product development.

Olivier Libouban, a native of France, has been working for 25 years in the software industry for large corporations and start-ups as a software engineer and as a project leader. Olivier has a wide ranging experience in the US, France, Switzerland and Norway in R&D departments as well as client projects of all sizes with complex software environments.


Click here to download the “Is it Internationalized? A New Way to Keep Score” slides in .pdf format.

i18n Case Study: Internationalizing and Localizing Cisco’s TelePresence

In this one-hour online event, presenters from Lingoport, Sajan and Cisco reviewed and discussed some of the challenges faced in internationalizing and localizing TelePresence, including several technologies used in its various components. The presenters also discussed how i18n development, localization and testing were tightly integrated into Cisco’s development and QA process, producing better engineering and linguistic results. Thanks to those of you who attended the live webinar.

Internationalizing and Localizing Cisco’s TelePresence – A Case Study

Cisco TelePresence is an exciting telecommunications system that provides high-definition 1080p video, spatial audio, and a setup designed to link two physically separated rooms so they resemble a single conference room even though the two rooms may be on opposite sides of the world. Since its official launch in 2006, Cisco TelePresence has been making a powerful impact on corporate meetings, communication and travel.

Global by its very nature, TelePresence faced some internationalization and localization challenges, and Cisco decided to partner with Lingoport and Sajan for expert help.

In this webinar recording, Richard Faubert, QA Manager at Cisco, joins Adam Asnes of Lingoport and Gary Condon of Sajan to review and discuss some of the challenges faced in internationalizing and localizing TelePresence, including several technologies used in its various components. The presenters also discuss how i18n development, localization and testing was tightly integrated into Cisco’s development and QA process, producing better engineering and linguistic results.

Webinar: “Internationalizing and Localizing Cisco’s TelePresence – A Case Study”
Date and time: This webinar was originally held on Thursday, May 19, 2011
Webinar Recording:
Request the recording of this webinar by completing the form at the bottom of this page

This webinar targets professionals involved in internationalization and localization, including Technical Managers, Software Developers, Localization Engineers and Managers, Internationalization Engineers and Managers, Product and Project Managers, and anyone with a stake in releasing software for global markets

Presenters

  • Richard Faubert, QA Manager, Cisco
  • Adam Asnes, President & CEO at Lingoport
  • Gary Condon, Engineering Manager at Sajan

About Cisco Systems
Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) is the worldwide leader in networking that transforms how people connect, communicate and collaborate. Information about Cisco can be found at http://www.cisco.com. For ongoing news, please go to http://newsroom.cisco.com.

About Lingoport
Lingoport helps globally focused technology companies adapt their software for worldwide markets with expert internationalization and localization consulting and Globalyzer software.

Globalyzer, a market leading software internationalization tool, helps entire enterprises and development teams to effectively internationalize existing and newly developed source code and to prepare their applications for localization.
For more information, please visit http://lingoport.com or http://globalyzer.com

About Sajan
Sajan is a leading global language translation and localization provider. Founded in 1997, Sajan helps clients reach global markets in every language. Our language services are backed by the industry’s top ranked translation management system – GCMS – which automates the translation workflow to provide better schedule predictability, higher quality and cost controls to our clients. Based out of the United States, we also have offices in Ireland, Spain and India. Sajan is publicly traded on the NASDAQ under the symbol SAJA.OB. Learn more about Sajan at www.sajan.com.