New Lingoport Releases | Connectivity Dashboard Improvements & More

Boulder, CO December 11, 2019 – Lingoport releases significant updates to its suite of software, helping software teams and enterprises reach worldwide customers with internationalized and localized software.

Lingoport Suite includes:

  • Globalyzer for continuous internationalization (i18n)
  • Lingoport Resource Manager (LRM) for localization automation updates from software repository to translator and back again, with no developer hassle.
  • InContext Translation & QA to deliver context to translators and reviews for better and faster translation and linguistic review
  • Lingobot for project collaboration and controls via Slack and MS Teams
  • Dashboard for visibility, issues drill down and more

See https://lingoport.com/products for an overview as well as specific product pages.

Connectivity

The headline addition to LRM is supported API connections to leading TMSs including XTM, MemSource, SDL TMS and WorldServer via SDL ManTra, as well as delivering InContext within SDL Trados. Lingobot also adds support for MS Teams and other features.

Dashboard Redesign

We have made some major updates to our Dashboard, which is included with Lingoport Suite, as well as individual Suite components. The redesign helps focus users on critical information quickly, and we think it looks pretty too.

There are numerous other improvements covering usability, localization file-types, security and delivering continuous i18n, L10n and testing data during software development.

See the links below for release notes and more feature details:

“It’s exciting to see our teams deliver broad and meaningful improvements to our products based on feedback from our customers,” explained Adam Asnes, Lingoport’s CEO. “We have a strong connection to our user base and that’s motivating and helpful as we enhance our offering.”

Learn more: https://lingoport.com/products
Wiki: https://wiki.lingoport.com

An Interview About G10n Culture with Elizabeth Riley, Vistatec

As part of Lingoport’s December webinar, 5 Steps to Create a Software Globalization Culture, we interviewed our featured guest speaker, Elizabeth Riley, Solutions Architect at Vistatec, to get some quick insights into the current state and future of localization. Elizabeth explores internal team processes and how cross-team collaboration is affected by technology and G10n knowledge/support within your organization.

 

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

How has Localization evolved since you began in the industry? Where do you see the industry 10 years from now?

Elizabeth Riley: The industry has changed a ton since I began working in it. There has been so much technological innovation it’s affected pretty much every aspect of the work and made previously unimaginable gains in productivity become new benchmarks for throughput.

Personally, I feel like the localization biz is experiencing something like an industrial revolution whereby translations have heretofore been done “by hand” and are moving to a method of “machine” production that’s powered by automation and of course machine translation. Of course, at present, use of MT is far from being standard practice and is still seen by many as a novelty if not an outright joke. At the rate that automation, MT and NMT, and other yet-to-be seen technologies are emerging and developing, however, I’d be surprised if in ten years we’ll still see it as standard practice to employ a “hand-crafted”, 100% human-powered translation process.

This doesn’t mean that I think human translators will be phased out in ten years and replaced by bots. When we talk about innovations in translation, there’s always a risk it’s perceived as this scenario where automation leads to mechanization and the complete eradication of human translators. But I have a more optimistic view of things. While we may be undergoing a sort of “industrial revolution” in our industry fueled by technological innovation, our “output” is still, ultimately, foreign language. As a human construct, I believe that language, and by extension, translation and localization, will never be completely mechanized even with vast technological innovation. In the future, innovations will allow those of in the industry to best apply our knowledge and intelligence; say, in curating foreign language content, post-editing NMT output, evaluating translation quality, rather than repetitively spend our time engaged in the execution of repetitive manual tasks like sending files, downloading updates, or gathering data.

 

How have advances in L10n technology impacted G10n processes and internal team collaboration?

Elizabeth Riley: The advent of tools like translation management systems have allowed for huge improvements in internal collaboration, not to mention process improvements. Modern enterprise TMSs have tons of features that permit substantial and extensive automation of processes that were previously done one at a time: think automated assignment of linguists to a project, workflows that automate project kickoff and task routing, even vendor quality ranking and allocation. Centralization driven by TMSs also allows teams to best leverage shared content, such as memories, glossaries, and the like, and made it much easier to do this as well. On the process side, I hardly know where to begin; we now have tools that are sophisticated enough to visually render web pages and certain applications that allow for certain software QA tasks to occur far earlier in the project cycle, which is a huge benefit for globalization because of course it allows internationalization and localization issues to be caught sooner – or eliminated altogether.

 

What is the biggest opportunity to improve L10n processes?

Elizabeth Riley: I honestly think that the biggest opportunity to improve localization processes rests in educating customers/localization project and program managers on the depth and breadth of tools that are already available on the market to automate, centralize, and streamline our work. It’s true that innovation continues to happen, and at a very exciting and rapid pace. But I feel the thing that would bring the most benefit to the greatest number of folks working in localization would be something very simple – just greater awareness of the tools already out there and some education on how to quickly start using them. There is so much already available that can be used to solve common—but still complex—problems. People should be better made aware of them and it should be easier to use and master such tools.

 

What would you describe as the number one globalization challenge organizations face?

Elizabeth Riley: I really like this question. I’ve worked with customers in a variety of industries, from medical device to gaming, religious organizations to startups creating dating apps, and what I’ve noticed is that everyone thinks their worst globalization challenges are unique to their organization, when in fact their challenges are just variations on a theme that everyone else has probably experienced at some time. So I’d answer this by saying that the biggest challenge organizations face is lacking awareness of how common their localization problems are – and by extension, how much information, insight, knowledge and tools are out there already to help them solve them. I suppose what I’m saying is that the biggest challenge is everyone’s lack of awareness how certain things are intrinsic to localization, regardless of industry or vertical, and as such, there are myriad suitable ways to solve those problems that are already in use by those who have come across it already. There could be more knowledge-sharing across verticals. The commonalities are greater than the differences, I think.

 

How does a lack of support and understanding from leadership teams impact globalization quality and efficiencies?

Elizabeth Riley: When leadership and management don’t understand localization, or even language, for that matter, it has an enormous effect on quality and efficiency. A great number of quality issues can be obviated or at least minimized at a process stage far sooner than by the time software gets sent out to be localized. This is an inefficiency in terms of cost but also time, of course. But if an organization’s management sees localization as an afterthought, it is—as we’ve all frequently seen—relegated to the last stop in a project process and subject to numerous time and cost pressures. If global organization leaders understood language and localization better, you might see localization departments brought to the forefront of any process development as a way to introduce quality at source, both in-language and in English, and save substantial amounts of money not having to test and fix issues later.

Date/Time

  • Date: October 24th, 2019
  • Time: 9AM Pacific, Noon Eastern, 18:00 CEST
  • Duration: 40 minutes, plus audience Q&A

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

 

Webinar: 5 Steps to Create a Software Globalization Culture

How do we create a culture within our organizations, where team members proactively think globally to develop products that are optimized for internationalization and localization? And how do we optimize for the unique needs of worldwide users and partners?

In this webinar, Lingoport and special guest Vistatec analyze the most most effective ways to bridge the gap between G10n needs, understanding, & support to foster a forward-thinking globalization culture within your own organization..

View i18n Webinar Recording

A Powerhouse of Localization Experience

In this webinar, we hear from Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, Olivier Libouban, VP of Product Development at Lingoport, and Elizabeth Riley, Solutions Architect at Vistatec, each industry veterans with 15-20+ years of localization experience.

Elizabeth has worked in localization since 2003. She has held various positions with translation and localization service providers from roles in linguistic QA to L10n business development to her current role at Vistatec, focusing on solutions architecture.

Topics We Cover:

      • Winning ways of getting the globalization message out
      • Proving the globalization point
      • Systems to measure i18n, and enhance L10n speed and collaboration
      • Gaining visibility within your organization
      • Repeating the message
      • Being part of the plan
      • Engaging stakeholders and gaining budget

    View i18n Webinar Recording

What is Continuous Localization?

More data and information has been discovered and recorded in the last ten years than in all of human history combined.

Every day, millions of users access hundreds of millions of websites and interact with the online world and each other through technology. With technology’s wildly fast rate of evolution comes new challenges. How do you make sure that your content and information is translated properly and developed to manage international and global needs? This is where localization comes in.

While localization itself is an important practice, it’s becoming an impossible task. There is simply too much content, data and information generated and accessed every single day for any workforce to keep up on its own. Continuous localization is an emerging method that gives users constantly updated data. So what does that mean and how it can impact you and your business?

 

What is Localization?

First, let’s discuss localization and why it’s vital for businesses in the modern era. As mentioned above, localization is the practice of making your content and data viewable and readable in various locales all over the world. This most often entails translating not only the words but also the message of your content for international readers.

The challenge of localization is the speed at which content is created, data is spread and information is consumed. The internet is churning out new data every single day by the millions and, try as they might, human translators and localization experts simply cannot keep up with the demand on their own.

Localization also goes beyond simply translating; it means optimizing graphics and messaging to meet the tastes and habits of the market. Localization must adapt design and layout to display the translated text and take into account any special features, like images or videos, that also need to be addressed. Basically, it’s a lot to handle.

There are three types of localization with various approaches within each model. There is waterfall localization, wherein complete versions of a product are released once the master version is ready; and agile localization, which refers to content prepared during the development cycle. Continuous localization is the third type, which is perhaps the most effective in an ever-changing market.

 

What is Continuous Localization?

Enter continuous localization, which can help alleviate the burden of trying to keep up with localizing on an irregular basis. Continuous localization is a new approach to global content, and it is the best option for content that updates or changes frequently. The traditional localization method is micromanaged to the extreme and heavily planned.

Continuous localization is instead more agile, occurring when changes in content trigger a need for an update to a specific section instead of the entire piece of content. This allows continuous localization to function at a higher and more efficient pace.

All content needs to be created, then translated and delivered. However, some content is constantly updating and changing, and in these cases, it’s important to continue to localize. Continuous localization allows you and your company to make these translations quickly and in specific places, increasing efficiency in a sustainable, secure way.

Furthermore, continuous localization can help manage the local regulations and legal requirements, which exist in every market and can be somewhat of a headache without a system in place to make sure everything remains in check.

 

Why is Continuous Localization Important? 

While continuous localization can be applied to many types of content, it works especially well in places where content is not interconnected with other pieces of the website, such as forums and online reviews. Continuous localization delivers translated content as quickly as possible, reduces costs and improves the overall quality by reducing inefficiencies, allowing your team to work on higher value tasks.

Whereas with both waterfall and agile localization you must create the content or software beforehand and finish its production, continuous localization allows you to do a lot of work after the fact, cutting down on time and labor. Not to mention, it also helps to increase security by allowing you to track and control how content is distributed to stakeholders, while also optimizing the process.

While transferring your localization from a people-driven team to a continuous, more technological model can be tricky, it’s the best way to efficiently localize your content and websites. Delaying content localization can result in lower customer satisfaction and missed global opportunities.

When seeking ways to localize, continuous localization stands as the most efficient process to adopt for your business, website and content.

An Interview About L10n Customization with Paul Hegarty, Iota

As part of Lingoport’s October webinar, Bringing a Human Touch to Continuous L10n, we interviewed our featured guest speaker, Paul Hegarty, Head of Engineering at Iota, to get some quick insights into the current state and future of localization. Specifically, Paul explores how advances in automation technology is impacting the customization, speed, and quality of localization output.

 

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

How has Localization evolved since you began in the industry? Where do you see the industry 10 years from now?

Paul Hegarty: Massively. I started in the l10n industry in 1994, and large QA teams were a part of all l10n providers. Manuals were printed, software was mass produced on disk sets and CDs, online was really only in its infancy. Cloud computing has completely changed how we work, QA is now a mixture of shorter, targeted test passes with the ability to fix issues almost “live”. Updates are now much more frequent and less static, they can occur at any time, and for numerous reasons. The cloud has completely changed how we work, how we communicate, how projects are run and delivered. Online technologies have replaced a lot of the desktop technologies we used – documentation is now usually built via web based build systems rather than compiled on a desktop. In another 10 years I see the industry being further distanced from the concept of “desktop” computing – everything we do will be in the cloud, and we’ll become more and more device agnostic.

 

Why has customization become so important for L10n?

Paul Hegarty: The variety of file types, the content within those file types and how dev teams address l10n (which is often a low priority) mean that what we actually get to translate is far from a standard format. While some long established dev teams have their product well prepared for l10n, many of the products we see are new (that’s becoming more common), with the result that a proper l10n strategy has not been defined. In a lot of cases, a proper strategy might never be defined as these products are under constant change. Hence, we often find ourselves having to customize solutions for individual projects to make sure our translators can access everything they need to access, in a manner that is productive for them, whilst hiding them from the material that they don’t want or need to see. The other element to this is the very granular requirements around some of the projects we see, where certain components of a project might be translatable in one language but not in others. So not only are we customizing for a massive variety of file formats, but the complexity of translation requirements of the overall project is increasing also.

 

How have advances in L10n technology and processes impacted the quality, speed, and needs of L10n??

Paul Hegarty: I think the demands of l10n customers are driving the l10n technologies, not the other way around. Our industry and the technologies we employ are driven by the increasing demands of our customers. Speed is crucial as release schedules get tighter and tighter, and volumes continue to grow. Efficient reuse of previous translation is critical to the success of projects that are constantly being updated.

 

What would you describe as the leading challenge of blending technologies and customizability?

Paul Hegarty: For me, that is deciding when you employ and pay for an off-the-shelf technology compared with a customized solution. For established projects with large volumes and lots of updates, where the workflow is defined, it makes sense that a technology solution will work (and importantly will be worth paying for). For new projects, not so defined (dev teams unfamiliar with l10n), with smaller volumes and constantly changing formats and requirements, customized solutions are the answer as the overhead in terms of time and expense for technology solutions often will not be an option.

 

What is the biggest opportunity to improve L10n processes?

Paul Hegarty: Hard question to answer – in the ideal world, l10n being part of the dev approach to product design – all to often, l10n is an afterthought. From our perspective, being able to adapt to our customers’ needs, advise and educate on best practices around l10n and always reviewing our processes and approach to our customers’ projects is the answer. Improvement is a continuous goal.

Date/Time

  • Date: October 24th, 2019
  • Time: 9AM Pacific, Noon Eastern, 18:00 CEST
  • Duration: 40 minutes, plus audience Q&A

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

 

Webinar: Bringing a Human Touch to Continuous L10n

Continuous Localization is far from a “one size fits all” endeavor. In fact, the best technologies are nothing more than shelfware if you’re not fulfilling unique technical and business requirements. It takes bespoke attention to service, customizing to the unique needs of enterprise customers, security and software requirements, product teams, and target markets.

In this webinar, Lingoport and IOTA will be analyzing the most common personalized engagement needs we’ve experienced within client organizations to ensure the highest level of customer success.

View i18n Webinar Recording

A Powerhouse of Localization Experience

In this webinar, we’ll hear from Lingoport’s own Adam Asnes, CEO and Olivier Libouban, VP of Product Development along with featured guest speakers from Iota, Paul Hegarty and Graham Rigby.

Paul is Head of Engineering at Iota and has worked in localization since 1994. He has held various positions with translation service providers from roles in QA and localization engineering, through analysis/pre-sales support roles to his current Head of Engineering position at Iota.

Graham is Business Development Director at Iota and has been involved in the software industry for nearly 20 years, working in a broad range of client-side and LSP based roles in sales, marketing and solutions architecture.

What You Will Learn

  • New practical ideas to help your localization go smoother and faster!
  • How to eliminate friction points, delays and hiccups between development and localization
  • How to avoid unforeseen costs
  • How quality L10n engineering and systems enhance your efforts
  • Future proofing your program as your organization expands its global focus

Date/Time

  • Date: October 24, 2019
  • Time: 9AM Pacific, Noon Eastern, 18:00 CEST
  • Duration: 40 minutes, plus audience Q&A

View i18n Webinar Recording

An Interview About Globalization Technology with Allison McDougall

As part of Lingoport’s webinar, Learn Continuous i18n & L10n, and Buy a Droid Too!, we interviewed our featured guest speaker, Allison McDougall, SVP of Global Sales at Amplexor, to get some quick insights into the current state and future of globalization including processes, technology, communication, and opportunities for improvement.

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

 

How has i18n technology evolved since you began in the industry?

Allison McDougall: Evolution from traditional ‘train-the-trainer’-style teaching developers how to develop code with localization in mind; evolution from identifying potential I18N issues once development is finished to agile-based, ‘real-time’, continuous I18N. It’s been incredible to witness the combined evolution of both Technology as well as overall global awareness!

 

What would you describe as the leading challenge of blending technologies and service?

Allison McDougall: Ah, great question! I would say “Understanding the BUSINESS need and ensuring that all team members continue to stay on the same page in terms of requirements, interdependencies, and communication.”

 

How do you feel globalization will evolve over the next 20 years? How will the technology continue to evolve?

Allison McDougall: Most of us are feeling the effects of increased automation and AI in the industry now … Content and software DEVELOPMENT will become much more automated, as will globalization efforts. Content data stores will be used to create more content, and we’ll be able to globalize much faster using existing technologies that embed AI and are able to make complex decisions ‘on the fly’. People working in this industry will become even more strategic, more valuable, more consultative as we educate clients and executives about the pros/cons around developing software and content that most effectively aligns with business goals.

 

What is the biggest opportunity to improve globalization processes?

Allison McDougall: Identify your internal Champion. Move up the value chain, insist upon your ‘seat at the table’, create globalized software and content at source — something we have been evangelizing for well over a decade. Globalization can no longer be an after-thought.

Date/Time

  • Date: September 26th, 2019
  • Time: 9AM Pacific, Noon Eastern, 18:00 CEST
  • Duration: 40 minutes, plus audience Q&A

 

Ready to learn more? View the webinar today!

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

 

Webinar: Learn Continuous i18n & L10n, and Buy a Droid Too!

Are you a Star Wars fan? Are you struggling to gain globalization support from your organization?

Register for our upcoming webinar, “Learn Continuous i18n & L10n, and Buy a Droid Too!,” for the exclusive debut and demonstration of our new Star Wars themed sandbox e-commerce site.

You’ll be able to explore i18n issues in real-time, share with your team, & provide a better understanding of i18n & continuous L10n issues, processes, and technologies. Battling the “dark side” of globalization…just became fun!

View i18n Webinar Recording

“Use The Force”…of i18n and L10n Technology

Lingoport has created an e-commerce site, Rebel Outfitters, that demonstrates the concept and technologies that put internationalization, localization, context and Linguistic QA in sync with the speed and changes of agile development.

Want to localize for Yoda? How about Sith? After the webinar you’ll have first access to play with the sandbox, explore our various Star Wars themed i18n and L10n issues, share with your team, and have some fun.

i18n and L10n Jedi Master Insights

In this webinar we’ll hear from Adam Asnes, CEO of Lingoport, Olivier Libouban, VP of Product Development at Lingoport, and Allison McDougall, SVP of Global Sales at Amplexor, each industry veterans with extensive globalization experience.

Featured Guest

The webinar will features special guest, Allison McDougall, SVP of Global Sales at Amplexor. Allison is a board member of Women in Localization and a globalization-guru with over twenty years of multi-faceted experience. She’ll be sharing her extensive knowledge and insights, discussing the challenges and opportunities of blending technologies and service for fast and efficient globalization.

 

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

Date/Time

  • Date: September 26, 2019
  • Time: 9AM Pacific, Noon Eastern, 18:00 CEST
  • Duration: 40 minutes, plus audience Q&A

View i18n Webinar Recording

An Interview About Globalization with Kevin Benson

As part of Lingoport’s webinar, How to Engage Your Organization and Gain Critical Globalization Support, we interviewed guest speaker, Kevin Benson, Global VP of Corporate Sales at United Language Group to get some quick insights into the state of globalization including processes, communication, and opportunities for improvement.

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

How has globalization evolved since you started in the industry?

Kevin Benson: Process optimization and enhancement, to support human translation, are the most noticeable differences in the industry over the last decade. The ability to seamlessly share content from internal systems of record, without human intervention, has allowed companies to expand their efforts at globalization. Incorporating MT to augment human-based process, in addition to TM, is quickly changing the face of globalization as companies are able to leverage globalization across a broader spectrum of content and processes.

 

What would you describe as the number one globalization challenge organizations face?

Kevin Benson: Budgetary constraints continue to hamper globalization efforts across companies at a global level. Globalization is often considered as an afterthought around processes which are already optimized for throughput.

 

How does a lack of support and understanding from leadership teams impact globalization quality and efficiencies?

Kevin Benson: Not considering the budgetary implications of globalization often times causes companies to accept short-cuts in the globalization process which directly impact process efficiency and quality of final content. A firm understanding of globalization processes, investment requirements and overhead of not addressing early in the process is critical to success. Many leadership teams are frustrated by the investment required to ensure global acceptance of their products, but fail to consider or understand the potential cost savings offered by pre-planning and process optimization in the area of globalization.

 

What is the biggest opportunity to improve globalization processes?

Kevin Benson: Technology and trusted vendor partnerships go hand-in-hand in improving globalization process. Building a globalization process on a foundation of technology, supported by a collaborative team of resources offers tremendous gains on long-term investment and time to market.

Ready to learn more? View the webinar today!

Date/Time

  • Date: August 22, 2019
  • Time: 9AM Pacific, Noon Eastern, 18:00 CEST
  • Duration: 40 minutes, plus audience Q&A

 

View i18n Webinar Recording

 

 

Webinar: How to Engage Your Organization and Gain Critical Globalization Support

It’s surprising, but here in 2019, our industry professionals are still fighting US-Centric perspectives that see software globalization as a low priority.  There are still attitudes that US English is fine for expanding to global customers.

The battle has certainly gotten easier, but it still remains. There’s also tactical friction, in that localization can seem expensive and to get in the way.

There are many globalization objections and conditions I have heard in the last couple of years.

View i18n Webinar Recording

Globalization Objections and Conditions

  • Our customers are technical and need to learn English anyway.
  • Our distributor says that if we give them our source code, they can just replace the strings with Chinese (what is this, 1995?).
  • We are already selling in these countries without doing anything new.
  • Localization is expensive.
  • We’ve already internationalized, but we’ve never tested that out and never translated.
  • We just don’t have time for that, we’re under a lot of release time pressure.
  • That’s a just translation.

These issues and judgements are a symptom of misunderstandings and limited mindsets.

There are organizational objections and impediments to globalization success that start with broad cultural mindset shortcomings, and then there are those that ultimately deal with day to day points of friction. As localization leaders, we need to consider both.

Localization is much more than a project management exercise, even if that is a person’s literal job title.

Webinar

In our webinar, we address cultural and tactical directives toward building more globally aware and responsive teams. We cite examples from experience, plus we’ve polled a few known industry experts.

And if you want to share your own success story, let us know and we can include it in the webinar.

View i18n Webinar Recording

Date/Time

Date: August 22, 2019
Time: 9am PT | 12pm ET | 18:00 CET
Duration: 45 minutes, plus audience Q&A

View i18n Webinar Recording